Walking the Labyrinth with our Powers

The labyrinth is a powerful symbol for The Journey, and presents a fitting opportunity to think about our intentions for our reinvention as this phase of summit winds down.

Here’s a little report about how we used a labyrinth last week in a culminating activity for a 10 week Hero’s Journey program with pregnant and parenting teens.  We brought a portable canvass 7 circuit labyrinth that we’d created to the school.

In previous sessions, we explored dimensions of power, suggesting that you have power when “you can transform yourself or a situation to overcome an obstacle or meet a challenge.”  The girls created “power talismans” that contained words that expressed their strongest powers, the powers that they most wanted to develop, and the powers that they hoped for their children.  The girls walked to the center of the labyrinth, placed their talismans there, then walked out, reflecting on their intention to use their powers for their ongoing journey.  Back in the classroom we passed the talking stick and shared our experiences.

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3 comments

  1. Thank you Bob, for sharing uncle Louie’s wisdom. For some reasons it reminded me of my mother. She was born in Latvia (another Baltic country) and had been deported by the Germans during WW II. After roaming through different countries she ended up in Venna (where I was born). She never returned to Latvia. My mother was an introvert woman who seldom shared feelings or information about her past. When she was old, she went for a holiday to Aland, an island between Sweden and Finland. When she returned she told me that she had seen birch trees by the rocky coast and that she had cried her heart out and had realized that she had missed this sight since she had been a girl. The white bark and the fresh green of the leaves in the Scandinavian midsummer sun had been a symbol of happier days. For me birch trees have become a symbol or the moment my mother showed herself and her longing for her (lost) roots to me.

  2. It sounds like a very meaningful experience. I would have loved to be part of the experience as well — the entire 10 weeks — for it sounds like it is important, excellent work you are doiing.
    I’d love to know more —
    about their receptiveness to the walk
    about their discussion afterwards
    about their strongest powers, why they chose them and plans to develop them
    about any changes you have observed over the 10 weeks

    thanks for sharing,
    sue

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